English 131 Syllabus

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University of Washington 131
UW in the High School – Lynden Christian School

Mr. Thomas
Fall Semester

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UW 131: Course Overview
English 131 (from UW EWP Website)

As gateways to academic reading, research, and writing at the University of Washington, all Expository
Writing Program (EWP) courses are designed around a set of shared learning outcomes. These outcomes articulate
the need for students to develop and practice the skills and habits
that are foundational to academic writing and to recognize how
to adapt these skills and habits for the varied demands of
university-wide writing that students will encounter.
The most popular Expository Writing Program offering, in
English 131, students work closely with their peers and instructor
to develop a portfolio of writing that reflects an ability to write
papers with complex claims that matter in academic contexts.
The readings in this class focus on academic discourse from a
variety of disciplines.
The course will be taught in Two Academic Sequences:
Sequence 1 – Ethics and Decision Making (Academic and Analytical Writing)
Sequence 2 – Pop Culture Persuasion (Persuasion and Argumentation)

English 131 Course Description:
Do you know what you should write, and when?
Sometimes a writer has to speak formally, as if they are in an
interview; sometimes the get to speak like they are with their
friends in a locker room. Sometimes, a writer needs to push, other
times they need to invite. Most importantly, the write needs to
understand context — the time and place in which you are
writing, and the audience to whom you are writing.
Particularly, we will develop the skills that will be useful in
both academic and professional settings. This process requires
careful reading, complex argumentation based on solid
evidence, and thoughtful revision and proofreading of your
work. Academically, we will write for the sake of analysis and
argumentation as it relates to reading and response of academic issues. As for Professional and Technical Writing,
we will focus on Advertising, Branding, and Campaigning as a way to emphasize persuasive and argumentative
texts.
Over the course of the semester, you will produce 6 Small Papers (SP) of 2-3 pages and 2 Major Papers
(MP) of 5-7 pages; you will also engage in a drafting process that will culminate in a Final Writing Portfolio that
will ask you to reflect upon how your writing exemplifies the EWP Outcomes (listed below). Throughout the
quarter, these outcomes will guide our discussions and focus our writing practice. Achieving proficiency in these
outcomes will give you a strong foundation for writing across disciplines in your academic work in the next few

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years.. Our course readings will explore the ways that writers use language in different contexts. We will
consider and produce texts for personal, public, and academic purposes based on reading research, data, and
feedback and, in doing so, we will watch our voices shape and shift toward their final destination
Required Texts –
• Acts of Inquiry
• Pop Culture

EWP Outcomes (from UW EWP Website)
All coursework will be evaluated according to University of Washington EWP Outcomes:

  1. To demonstrate an awareness of the strategies that writers use in different writing
    contexts.

    The writing employs style, tone, and conventions appropriate to the demands of a
    particular genre and situation.

    The writer is able to demonstrate the ability to write for different audiences and contexts,
    both within and outside the university classroom.

    The writing has a clear understanding of its audience, and various aspects of the writing
    (mode of inquiry, content, structure, appeals, tone, sentences, and word choice) address and
    are strategically pitched to that audience.

    The writer articulates and assesses the effects of his or her writing choices.
  2. To read, analyze, and synthesize complex texts and incorporate multiple kinds of
    evidence purposefully in order to generate and support writing.

    The writing demonstrates an understanding of the course texts as necessary for the purpose
    at hand.

    Course texts are used in strategic, focused ways (for example: summarized, cited, applied,
    challenged, re-contextualized) to support the goals of the writing.

    The writing is intertextual, meaning that a “conversation” between texts and ideas is created
    in support of the writer’s goals.

    The writer is able to utilize multiple kinds of evidence gathered from various sources
    (primary and secondary – for example, library research, interviews, questionnaires,
    observations, cultural artifacts) in order to support writing goals.

    The writing demonstrates responsible use of the MLA (or other appropriate) system of
    documenting sources.
  3. To produce complex, analytic, persuasive arguments that matter in academic
    contexts.

    The argument is appropriately complex, based in a claim that emerges from and explores a
    line of inquiry.

    The stakes of the argument, why what is being argued matters, are articulated and
    persuasive.

    The argument involves analysis, which is the close scrutiny and examination of evidence
    and assumptions in support of a larger set of ideas.

    The argument is persuasive, taking into consideration counterclaims and multiple points of
    view as it generates its own perspective and position.

    The argument utilizes a clear organizational strategy and effective transitions that develop
    its line of inquiry.
  4. To develop flexible strategies for revising, editing, and proofreading writing.

    The writing demonstrates substantial and successful revision.

    The writing responds to substantive issues raised by the instructor and peers.

    Errors of grammar, punctuation, and mechanics are proofread and edited so as not to
    interfere with reading and understanding the writing.

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University of Washington Grading Scale
This course fulfills all requirements for the University of Washington’s English 131 course, and uses all
required elements such as textbook, assessments, evaluation, and grading. UWHS courses are graded using the
UW’s numeric grading system. Grades can be assigned from 0.7 to 4.0; 0.7 is the lowest passing grade. For more
information the grading system and the numeric equivalent of letter grades please see this link: UWHS Grading
Equivalent Scale.

Letter

Number

Note

A

4.0 – 3.9

A-

3.8 – 3.5

B+

3.4 – 3.2

B

3.1 – 2.9

B-

2.8 – 2.5

C+

2.4 – 2.2

C

2.1 – 1.9

Lowest Passing Portfolio Grade

C-

1.8 – 1.5

Lowest grade to remain in class

D+

1.4 – 1.2

D

1.1 – 0.9

University of Washington Academic Integrity Statement
From the UW Student Conduct Code:
Admission to the university carries with it the presumption that students will conduct themselves as responsible
members of the academic community. As a condition of enrollment, all students assume responsibility to observe
standards of conduct that will contribute to the pursuit of academic goals and to the welfare of the academic
community. That responsibility includes, but is not limited to “Practicing the high standards of academic and
professional honesty and integrity,” and, insofar as the University of Washington has defined it in their academic
integrity statement.

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Sequence One Overview:
Ethics and Decision Making
SP 1.1: Form Analysis
Literary Form comes from the literary devices an author uses. In the Allegory of the Cave, Plato uses the
literary structure of the dialogue (a conversation between a teacher and his students). His goal: to have his students
envision how the world works.
Your job, then, is to become his student:
1.
2.
3.

Read/Annotate Allegory of the Cave
Isolate three symbols that help Plato tell his story
Write a Telescope-Correlation Essay
a. Thematic Introduction using UW Introduction Template
b. 3-OCI Paragraphs (examining three separate symbols in relation to theme)
c. Feature Conclusion (examine Plato’s ultimate point)

Keep in Mind:
The cave is not just a story, it’s a picture of a worldview. Remember that worldview and start a conversation
with it. Do you agree? Do you disagree? Where are you in relationship to this story? Are you a prisoner? Are you a
guardian? Even if it is not true as a whole, the story can maintain truths that let us examine ourselves
Focus:

  1. OCI Format
    a. Fact – Claim from Text
    b. Detail/Analysis — Examine Text
    c. Interpretation— Apply Abstract/Theme/Idea/Feeling
  2. Personalize the Information — Familiar Correlations
  3. Globalize the Information — Worldly Correlations
  4. Hooks/Transitions — keep the paragraphs tied together
    SP 1.1 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

OCI Format
(Outcome 1)
Claim from Inquiry
(Outcome 3)
Purposeful Evidence
(Outcome 2)
So What?
(Outcome 3)

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SP 1.2 – Argumentative Response
For this assignment, you have watched a documentary and a feature film. You have also encountered different
theories related to ethics and truth-telling. Your job, then, is to examine the implications of these theories in
relationship to the texts you have encountered and answer the following prompt:

Plato argues that people are prisoners who are kept in bondage by other people’s
knowledge. In looking at the classroom resources (Zeitgeist, Equilibrium, Clancy Martin’s
article), examine what happens to a culture when it stops seeking the truth.

To do so, do the following: Read/Annotate Clancy Martin’s Is it Okay to Tell a Lie? and construct a Complex-Claim
(problem and solution). Then write an Identify-Identify Correlation Essay:
d. Establish Problem using Minding the Gap Introduction using UW Introduction Template
e. 3 Paragraphs
a. Examine problem in Documentary (OCI)
b. Examine problem in Film (OCI)
c. Discuss Implications in both using voices from class (Deductive Response)
f. Editorial Conclusion (Why does truth matter — globally speaking?)
Keep in Mind:
This essay will be more involved than your last one — it will integrate more voices, it will use different paragraph
structures, and it will include more of your personal voice (it will be more argumentative).Focus:

  1. OCI Format
    a. Fact – Claim from Text
    b. Detail/Analysis — Examine Text
    c. Interpretation— Apply Abstract/Theme/Idea/Feeling
  2. Outcome #2 — Integrating Sources
  3. Implications — Subtext = What we do not see in the story
  4. Hooks/Transitions — keep the paragraphs tied to introduction

SP 1.2 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

I-I-C Format
(Outcome 1)
Complex-Claim
(Outcome 3)
Evaluate/Interpret
(Outcome 2)
SP 1.1 Comparison
(Outcome 4)

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MP 1.1 – Story of My Life
To this point, you have written for academic situations only. Now, using the skills based on the outcomes
below, you will have 8 Writing Scenarios for which you must do reading, viewing, and writing. Each Scenario will
require a different approach. After writing, you will have to evaluate your writing according to the UW Outcomes
and assess the difference between the situations to explain your writing strategy.
Scenario 1 — Letter of Recommendation
Scenario 2 — Police Report
Scenario 3 — Eye-Witness Account
Scenario 4 — Book Introduction
Scenario 5 — Graphic Novel
Scenario 6 — Facebook Fight
Focus Points:
Language and Decorum — Writing appropriate to the situation
Synthesis of Major Ideas — Integrating Academic Sources we have used within the course of the year
• Allegory of the Cave, Plato
• Moral Decision Making, Martin
• Zeitgeist Documentary
• Ways We See, Berger
Citations — demonstrate your understanding of
• Formal — Gladwell, when talking about the success of Joe Flomm, says “ . . . “ (44)
• Paraphrase — Gladwell says Joe Flomm was successful because of his background (44-50)
• Embedded — Gladwell knows Joe Flomm “saw hard work change” the lives around him (44)

MP 1.1 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

Decorum and Situation
(Outcome 1)
Synthesis and Texts
(Outcome 2)
Argument & Persuasion
(Outcome 3)

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Sequence Two Overview:
Marketing, Branding, Campaigning
SP 2.1 – Positioning Statement
The Positioning Statement is your target-market research, marketing personas, emotional triggers, and more; it
lays the foundation for the success of your marketing Developing the actual content of the case study is an exercise
in solid research, reporting, and writing. The trick is to develop a coherent narrative that will naturally bring out the
points you want to emphasize. Wherever possible, try to tie the narrative into current trends, issues, and ideas so the
article is part of what people already are buzzing about in the industry, in business in general, or in society at large.
There are five basic styles in which the case study can be written:

Problem-solution–by far the most common way to structure the case study. The narrative is simple: this
customer was wrestling with a particular problem or challenge or opportunity, and this is how the product
played a role in the solution. There are some variations within the basic problem-solution model, usually
involving implementation or future directions. [See the Case Study Template provided below.]

Results first–starts with results, especially when the results are unusual. Then you jump back to fill in the
why and how.

Inverted pyramid–comes straight from journalism. You proceed as if writing a detailed, journalistic news
article with a compelling opening followed immediately by the most important information.

Anecdotal-feature–also comes from journalism. Here the customer’s story is fleshed out with frequent
anecdotes.

First person account–the customer is telling the story directly, in his or her voice. (Your writer will
actually write the piece for the customer using the first- person voice.)

Writing Options:
Third-Person or Journalistic: In the third-person style, an unidentified narrator tells the story. This style is
particularly appropriate when the case study includes a lot of technical or highly specialized detail. The
journalistic style is much like the third-person style except it includes direct customer quotes. The quotes give the
case study more color and personality and create more emotional involvement. It requires that an individual at the
customer organization willing to have quotes attributed to him or her by name. The first-person voice provides
great believability. However, it requires more effort on the part of the customer, who will probably spend more time
with the writer and more time reviewing and revising the results. It also implies a deeper commitment to your
product, which the customer may be reluctant to make. After the text is developed, you can proceed with layout
and design. Use a photo/picture of the customer or a metaphorical picture that captures his dilemma/
solution.
SP 2.1 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

Writing Strategy
(Outcome 1)
Rhetorical Strategies
(Outcome 3)
Visual Text
(Outcome 2)

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SP 2.2 – Visual Text
Sales is concrete and abstract. With advertising, you have to make your words pictures and your pictures
words. You have isolated the needs of your Straw Man, now give him a pacifier — something that appeases the need.
Often, people don’t know they need it, but you — the marketer — need to convinces them. To do so, you will need to
integrate your reading and visuals related to Denasi’s Pop Culture (Pop Language, Marketing, Branding, and Advertising):
A Slogan – a phrase that summarizes your Straw Man’s “dilemma”
A Logo – a picture that captures the essence of the solution.
Consider These Slogans (see if you can place them)
Just Do It
Think Different
Impossible is Nothing
Your World. Delivered.
The Best a Man Can Get
Want to Get Away?
It’s in the Game.
Logos tell a picture with words. Consider These Logos (note what they are saying below):

You are the only one with the product to meet this person’s needs. You’ve done the research, you have
labelled your market, now how are you going to get the customer to the table? Are you to:
Sell Negatively — Against the Competitor
Hard Sell — Twist the customer’s arm
Soft Sell — Leave an impression
Sell Emotion — Fix a Need
Sell Logically — Solve a Problem
Sell Credibility – Make a Copycat
SP 2.2 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

Slogan
(Outcome 1)
Logo
(Outcome 3)
Appeals
(Outcome 2)
Message
(Outcome 4)

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SP 2.3 – Presidential Vitae
Now you need to become an campaign committee. Using Stimson Bullitt’s How to be a Politician as a
strategy, you need to decide to decide on your strategy for political influence. This vitae should demonstrate that
strategy. One of two results will come about:
1.

You’re the Committee — You Set the Agenda (Propaganda)
A. Advantage — you control the conversation
B. Disadvantage — your opinions may not reflect the people’s

2.

Market Research — Let the People “Talk” (Focus Groups)
A. Advantage – using other people’s voices to connect
B. Disadvantage — you may find yourself out of touch

In the end, you will have to write a one-page Vitae (overview of a person’s qualifications and experience).
This will be done in the form of a narrative description — not a sales pitch — that answers the primary question
every candidate will have to ask themselves:

Vitae
Define Leadership
Who is this campaign about?
Qualities of a good candidate
What is this campaign about?
Two job duties as a candidate

SP 2.3 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

Argument
(Outcome 4)
Writing Mechanics
(Outcome 3)
Rhetorical Strategy
(Outcome 2)
Integrated Reading
(Outcome 3)

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SP 2.4 – Posterizing
You have your vitae. You have your research. You have read Image-Making in the Post-Modern Age
(Olson, Finnegan, and Hope). Now, you have to create traction. You will need to make a poster that
chrysalises your campaign. It should have:

Metaphor/Synecdoche

Slogan

Problem/Solution

Representative Object that

Phrase that Captures

Both word and picture

clarifies the candidate’s

Essence of Campaign/

should clearly identify

objectives

Candidate

the candidate’s solutions

SP 2.3 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

Visual Appeals
(Outcome 3)
Major Claim
(Outcome 3)
Synthesized Message
(Outcome 4)
Connection to Reading
(Outcome 2)

MP 2.1: Humanize Me
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This final paper will examine the difference between advertising, branding, marketing and creating (artistic
and literary ventures). Being a Major Paper, you will write a 5-page (minimum) Classical Argument using personal
response, past research, classroom reading, and your own written/visual work to answer the following prompt:

What is the difference between brand, market, political texts versus literature —
and which gives us a better glimpse into who we are as human beings?
Your primary goal should be to show the difference between the motivations of commercialism versus the
motivations of the creative spirit. Before you write the paper, then, write a reflective response related to the
questions below (to be handed in). These address the EWP Writing Outcomes, so be mindful of each outcome’s
expectation as you answer. Answering these questions will also help you address the proper issues in your paper.

Paper Requirements
Paradoxical Introduction
(reflect on the nature of the different assignments and answer prompt with Major Claim)
Topic #1 – Straw Man (Outcome #1 – Audience/Situation)
How did it feel creating someone?
Why/How was it easy or hard?
What was missing from the process?
Topic #2 – Advertising (Outcome #4 – Editing)
What decisions need to be made to sell something?
What role do evaluators play in the creation of an Ad?
What happens to the final product through editorial review?
Topic #3 – Politics (Outcome #3 – Complex Arguments)
What happens when a person, not an object, needs to be sold?
What are different demands for media (writing, visual, audio-visual) in a campaign setting?
What was your reaction to the feedback (to yours specifically and to the other candidates’)?
Topic #4 – Literature and Art
What is the significant difference between these texts?
What are these people searching for, and do you think their desires are universal?
What do their creative expression say about the Human Condition?
Conclusion (Outcome #2 – Evidence)
(Comparative OCI Paragraph — why your conclusion works best in comparison to alternatives)
SP 2.3 Rubric

Outstanding

Strong

Adequate

Inadequate

Classical Argument
(Outcome 4)
Writing Mechanics
(Outcome 3)
Persuasion/Reflection
(Outcome 2)
Integrated Reading
(Outcome 2)

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